The Inspector’s Field Sampling Manual

That’s printed above the title page! Smaller print lower on the same page refers to A Sampling Manual and Reference Guide for Environment Canada Inspectors, First Edition. I perused its 231 pages and thought it ought to be revised. The more so since geostatistics is an invalid variant of applied statistics. Here’s why! A French scholar in the 1970s stripped the variance off the distance-weighted average, and called what was left a kriged estimate. Infinite sets of kriged estimates, zero kriging variances and zero degrees of freedom underpin Matheron’s science of geostatistics. Incredibly, geostatistics is an integral part of 2.0 Sampling in the Field and of 2.1 Site Selection and Documentation. The question is then why a stratified systematic sampling is an integral part of its very First Edition!

In fact, 1.1.1 Message from the Deputy Minister, pointed out the present edition will be updated as soon as more information is available and more lessons have been learned. Good thinking but slow learning! What sort of lessons do the inspectors of Environment Canada have to be familiar with before this field sampling manual will be revised?

Mel Cappe, Deputy Minister, may not have been taught why geostatistics is an invalid variant of applied statistics. Here’s why in a nutshell! Professor George Matheron and a few of his students traveled to the USA in the 1970s. Matheron invoked Brownian motion along a straight line. Marechal and Serra derived a set of sixteen (16) values from a set of nine (9). Geostatistics is an invalid variant of applied statistics because Matheron and his disciples did not know that degrees of freedom ought to be counted and why!

Did Mel Cappe and his team know how to count degrees of freedom? Surely, his inspectors ought to know how to count degrees of freedom and why! The fact that Matheron and his students did not count degrees of freedom should have been addressed. Yet, neither Section 2.0 Sampling in the Field and nor Section 2.1 Site Selection and Documentation, explain how, when and why degrees of freedom ought to be counted.

Mel Cappe is Professor in the School of Public Policy and Governance. He teaches in the Masters Program and is Coordinator of the Undergraduate program in Public Policicy. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada. Mel Cappe, unlike Professor Georges Matheron, should be able to count degrees of freedom flawlessly! It’s printed above the title page! Smaller print on the same page refers to A Sampling Manual and Reference Guide for Environment Canada Inspectors, First Edition. I perused its 231 pages and thought it ought to be revised. The more so since geostatistics is an invalid variant of applied statistics. Here’s why! A French scholar in the 1970s stripped the variance off the distance-weighted average, and called what was left a kriged estimate. Infinite sets of kriged estimates and zero degrees of freedom underpin Matheron’s science of geostatistics. Incredibly, geostatistics is an integral part of 2.0 Sampling in the Field and of 2.1 Site Selection and Documentation. The question is why stratified systematic sampling is an integral part of this First Edition!

In fact, 1.1.1 Message from the Deputy Minister, has pointed out that the present edition will be updated as soon as more information is available and more lessons have been learned. Good thinking but slow learning! What lessons do Environment Canada Inspectors have to learn before this field sampling manual will be revised?

Mel Cappe, Deputy Minister, may not have been taught why geostatistics is an invalid variant of applied statistics. Here’s why in a nutshell! Professor George Matheron and a few of his students traveled to the USA in the 1970s. Matheron invoked Brownian motion along a straight line. Marechal and Serra derived a set of sixteen (16) values from a set of nine (9). Geostatistics is an invalid variant of applied statistics because Matheron and his disciples did not know that degrees of freedom ought to be counted and why!

Did Mel Cappe and his team know how to count degrees of freedom? Surely, his inspectors ought to know how to count degrees of freedom and why! The fact that Matheron and his students did not count degrees of freedom should have been addressed. Yet, neither Section 2.0 Sampling in the Field and nor Section 2.1 Site Selection and Documentation, explain how, when and why degrees of freedom ought to be counted.

Mel Cappe is Professor in the School of Public Policy and Governance. He teaches in the Masters Program and is Coordinator of the Undergraduate program in Public Policicy. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada. Mel Cappe, unlike Professor Georges Matheron, should be able to count degrees of freedom flawlessly!

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